ICD-9 – ICD-10 Coding Training #icd #to #icd #transition


#

The Art of ICD-9-CM Coding for Home Health

Two-Day Diagnostic Coding Workshop
Designed for all levels of Home Health Clinicians and Coders
*Available beginning January 2014 will be offered until the implementation of ICD-10

This 2-day workshop is structured to provide comprehensive ICD-9-CM training that is crucial to successful coding NOW. Many agencies have fallen behind in ICD-9 proficiency as it was expected to be replaced by ICD-10 in October 2014. Industry audits have identified a multitude of coding errors which are having a negative impact on reimbursement, quality initiatives and risk adjustment. The ICD-10 implementation delay has made it even more important that coders are educated on CURRENT guidelines to prevent assigning codes based on outdated rules. This workshop is designed to address the needs of both veteran home health coders as well as the influx of new coders who have only recently entered the coding arena. This critical knowledge, along with application through workshop exercises and coding scenarios, will lead to coding accuracy and regulatory compliance while ICD-9 continues to be the HIPAA standard for coding assignment.

OUTLINE:

  • Examination of How Clinical Descriptions and the Language of Coding Differ
  • Selection and Sequencing Criteria for Primary and Secondary Diagnoses
  • Overview and Instruction for Proper Use of the ICD-9-CM Coding Manual
  • Recognition of ICD-9 Coding Conventions and the Use of Both General Chapter Specific Guidelines for Accurate Code Selection
  • Emphasis on Similarities Between ICD-9CM and ICD-10-CM
  • Discussion and Impact of CMS’ PPS and OASIS on Home Health Coding
  • Exploration of the Relationship Between V Codes, Case Mix Diagnoses and M1024/5
  • Exercises and Scenarios to Reinforce Critical Knowledge for Successful Coding

MANDATORY. You MUST bring a current ICD-9-CM Coding Manua l to the workshop!


Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill and Fayetteville, North Carolina, Free HDTV Channels and Antennas #hdtv, #rf,


#

Raleigh/Durham


You might want to watch this 8-minute video created by the Consumer Electronics Association

Getting the most from America’s New High-Definition Television System is simple and inexpensive. You just need an antenna for sets made after 2007, and a Converter Box if you have an older TV. No need to get cable, satellite or a new TV to enjoy America’s DTV Channels.

“Multicasting” allows stations to broadcast up to six new channels in the space of their old one. Channel 9, for instance, is now DTV channel 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, etc. Cable and satellite would have you believe they carry most of these new channels, but they don’t.

Cable and satellite strip and leave out most broadcast channels to save space for other $ervice$. To get genuine HDTV just add an antenna and converter to your existing setup. You’ll be amazed how many HDTV channels you can tune, and how much better everything looks over-the-air!

Find the keys to complete your HDTV System!

All 41 of these new channels, and many more, are Free. No cable or satellite is needed for any of them. Just select an Antenna, using the information below, to receive crystal clear HDTV signals Free in the Raleigh/Durham/Research Triangle Area.

Antenna Selection Guide
To find the perfect antenna, first list the RF Channels in Raleigh/Durham which you want to watch. The CEA. Consumer Electronics Association, and NAB. National Association of Broadcasters, created the AntennaWeb to help you with the rest. Free! An example of how it works is presented below.

NOTE that all TV stations are transmitting on different channels now. To avoid confusion, however, the new tuners and converter boxes allow a station to keep its old channel number while automatically switching you to its new RF Channel. Some of the new RF Channels are VHF but most are UHF.

RF Channels on your list numbered less than 14 are VHF. They need a broader antenna than UHF channels; the ones numbered 14 and up. Since HDTV is 91% UHF, you probably won’t need to use a broad antenna.

Most need an Indoor Antenna. They work just fine with older TVs using a converter box, and with all new TVs. You’ll need to use an Outdoor Antenna if you’re more than 15 miles from stations’ towers, but most towers are clustered near town and are very powerful.

EXAMPLE.
We’ll use a site near Tampa, Florida
Press AntennaWeb.org. then Press
“Click Here to Start,” then Enter the
ZIP Code 33772 and Press “Submit”

A Station Tower Map will appear beside a list, as shown below. The strongest stations are at the top. Record the RF channels, and Antenna Color Codes, of the stations you want to watch. You’ll need that information to select the proper Antenna .
To verify this Map and List. select TVFool.com using the same Zip Code, to get the following.

What’s important is to get-a-feel for the distances and directions to desirable stations’ towers (under “Dist” and “Azimuth” above). Let’s select CBS, ABC, FOX, NBC and PBS Networks, all of which are farther than 15 miles away. We’ll need to use an Outdoor Antenna to receive them. Fortunately, station towers are clustered in most cities – East of us in our example.

Antenna Color Codes
Color Codes represent an antenna’s reception strength. Within 15 miles of stations an Indoor Antenna can be used (in the Yellow, Green and Light Green Zones). Farther away you’ll need to use an Outdoor Antenna. Our Example calls for color codes blue and violet. The stronger violet type will work for both. Since four of our desirable stations’ RF channels are VHF (all but ABC are less than 14), we’ll need a broad UHF/VHF antenna.

Small Multi-Directional Antennas