Barriers to Medication Reconciliation #ambulatory,medication #reconciliation,medication #safety,patient #health #record,


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Barriers to Medication Reconciliation

Michael J. Gaunt, PharmD

Community pharmacists and emergency departments can improve patient safety by communication effectively to ensure that patient s medication profiles are accurate and up to date.

Medication reconciliation is a process that aims to improve patient safety and reduce the risk of medication error by ensuring that health care providers and patients have an up-to-date list of the medications a patient is taking. One important aspect of medication reconciliation s success depends upon emergency department (ED) and other hospital personnel accessing the patient s most up-to-date medication history from the outpatient setting. To do this, effective communication between community pharmacies and EDs is critical.

The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), through a grant from the Aetna Foundation, conducted a survey of community pharmacies and EDs in a large metropolitan area to assess the awareness of medication reconciliation, determine the degree of communication between community pharmacies and EDs, and identify barriers that prevent both from conducting medication reconciliation. 1 ISMP developed 2 surveys, 1 for community pharmacies and 1 for EDs, seeking to answer these questions.

The ED survey was completed by 13 hospital EDs. Eighty pharmacies, including independent, mass merchandiser, supermarket, and chain pharmacies, submitted responses for the community pharmacy survey. Although the response rates (19% for EDs and 42% for community pharmacies) were limited and the community pharmacy responses were skewed toward larger chain pharmacies, there is important information that can be gleaned from these results. In both settings, the majority of patients do not present a current list of their medications. To address this, hospitals and community pharmacies must educate patients about the importance of having an up-to-date list of their medications when interfacing with any part of the health care system. It should be a priority. Also, professionals in all health care settings must make a greater effort to provide a current list of medications to patients at each encounter.

Another survey finding was that communication between EDs and community pharmacies for the purpose of medication reconciliation was infrequent. One potential contributing factor may be that, compared with hospital EDs, community pharmacies are not typically open 24 hours. As a result, an ED practitioner may not be able to reach the patient s community pharmacist at night. However, if a patient purchases their medication at a chain pharmacy, a health care practitioner in the ED can call any 24-hour store in that chain, even if it is located in another state, to access current medication information.

Another factor limiting the effectiveness of medication reconciliation could be that patients receive their medications from several pharmacies (eg, community, mail service), which adds complexity. This calls for a common shared database of patient medication and medical history to be available to health care practitioners. All of the EDs that responded to the survey indicated personnel do not perceive the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) as a barrier to sharing information regarding a patient s medications with a community pharmacy. However, some EDs did report unwillingness on the part of the community pharmacies to share patient information due to perceived HIPAA violations.

Interestingly, obtaining correct and complete information on a patient s medication regimen was reported as a barrier, yet neither group cited major difficulties when direct communication between EDs and community pharmacies took place. This suggests that EDs and community pharmacies are able to communicate, but that complete patient medication information is not readily available to either of them. The establishment of a common database that, as mentioned above, can be shared among all health care providers is surely needed.

It is clear that a number of barriers make it difficult and inefficient to access and share complete medication information across the health care system. More effort is needed to provide EDs, community pharmacies, and patients with the necessary tools and resources to implement and maintain effective medication reconciliation processes. PT

Dr. Gaunt is a medication safety analyst and the editor of ISMP Medication Safety Alert! Community/ Ambulatory Care Edition.

Subscribe to Newsletter

Pharmacy Times and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) would like to make community pharmacy practitioners aware of a publication that is available. The ISMP Medication Safety Alert! Community/ Ambulatory Care Edition is a monthly compilation of medication-related incidents, error-prevention recommendations, news, and editorial content designed to inform and alert community pharmacy practitioners to potentially hazardous situations that may affect patient safety. Individual subscription price is $52 per year for 12 monthly issues. Discounts are available for organizations with multiple pharmacy sites. This newsletter is delivered electronically.


Lincoln Window Installation #window #installation, #window #replacement, #glass #repair, #screen #doors, #screen #windows, #sun #screens,


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Professional & Reliable Placer County Window Installation

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Downloadable Patient Safety Tools and Resources #resources, #tools, #safety, #patient, #downloadable


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Database of Downloadable Safety and Quality Tools Resources

Becker’s Operating Room Clinical Quality Infection Control finds and is provided with a wide range of downloadable tools and resources designed to help healthcare providers improve the quality of care they can provide to their patients and ensure a safe working environment for their staff members.

We have organized the tools and resources by category and placed links to reports which include free, downloadable and adaptable tools you can use in your organization.

Note: Tools provided for download are for educational purposes only. Please review your facility’s policies, accreditation standards, and state and federal agency requirements before adapting and using these resources in your organization.

Sign up for our FREE E-Weekly for valuable clinical quality and infection control news, analysis and tools sent to your inbox!

2 Simple Handwashing Posters
10 Hand Hygiene Posters for Clinical Staff From the Department of Veteran Affairs
10 Patient Safety Tools on Hand Hygiene: Global Handwashing Day
‘Clean Hands Save Lives’ Poster From CDC
‘Effective Disinfection: It’s in Your Hands’ Poster
GOJO’s Hand Hygiene Posters
‘Hand Hygiene: How’s Your Technique’ Posters
Hand Hygiene Poster Collection from Johns Hopkins
Hand Hygiene Poster from the Minnesota Department of Health
Hand Hygiene Posters Screen Saver From CDC
Hand Hygiene Screen Savers and Poster From ‘High Five for Healthy New Hampshire’
Handwashing Poster for Kids
Handwashing Reminder Door Sign
Handwashing Statistics Poster
‘How It Works: Cleaning Hands with Waterless Hand Sanitizer’ Poster
‘How to Handrub/Handwash’ Poster From WHO
‘I’m a Fan of Handwashing’ Restroom Sign
‘Love the Glove’ HAI Prevention Poster and Brochure
‘My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene’ Poster
‘Practice Hand Hygiene After Removing Gloves’ Poster

Sign up for our FREE E-Weekly for valuable clinical quality and infection control news, analysis and tools sent to your inbox!

Sign up for our FREE E-Weekly for valuable clinical quality and infection control news, analysis and tools sent to your inbox!


Surgical Site Infection/Wound Care

Note: Tools provided for download are for educational purposes only. Please review your facility’s policies, accreditation standards, and state and federal agency requirements before adapting and using these resources in your organization.

Copyright ASC COMMUNICATIONS 2017. Interested in LINKING to or REPRINTING this content? View our policies by clicking here .

To receive the latest hospital and health system business and legal news and analysis from Becker’s Hospital Review. sign-up for the free Becker’s Hospital Review E-weekly by clicking here .

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Debit Cards and Identity Theft: Are You at Risk? #debit #card #identity #theft, #debit #card


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Debit Cards and Identity Theft: Are You at Risk?

An increasing number of people are keeping track of their personal finances and control spending by using debit cards instead of credit cards when buying gas, groceries, and other daily expenses. Debit cards, or check cards, prevent people from overdrawing their checking or savings account. This is fairly smart money management in theory and in practice. However, as with credit cards, using a debit card carries some risks, and the rise in debit card use has led to a rise in debit card identity theft.

Victims of debit card identity theft often wonder how a thief gained access to their Personal Identification Number (PIN), which is the key to using a debit card to commit fraud. These are some of the more effective ways that thieves obtain debit card PINs:

  • Stolen purses and wallets
    Sometimes, a victim will make it easy for a thief to commit debit card identity theft by writing a PIN down on a piece of paper and storing it in his or her billfold. If a purse or wallet is lost or stolen, the thief has all the necessarily information to begin stealing from the victim and merchants alike. To prevent this from happening to you, memorize your PINs and never write them down.
  • Skimmers
    Every time you use a credit or debit card, a device reads the information stored on the magnetic strip on the back of the card. Thieves use that same technology to create skimmers that do the same thing. Skimmers can easily fit in the palm of a hand, and it only takes a moment for the device to skim and store your name and other account information. When you hand your debit card to another person, make sure to keep a sharp eye on it at all times, and be wary of any cashier who drops your debit card behind the counter for a moment.
  • Cameras installed at ATMs
    Automated Teller Machines make it easy for you to withdraw cash whenever you need it. However, the ubiquity of ATMs, combined with camera technology, can make it easy for thieves to install cameras at ATMs that can read numbers on a debit card and record the choices your fingers make as you enter your PIN. When entering your PIN into an ATM, be aware of your surroundings, and carefully cover the keypad.
  • Direct observation
    Identity thieves love lines at ATMs; they can surreptitiously watch people type their PINs into the keypad. Often, they work with an accomplice who robs the victim, and, with the PIN, they can access funds in the account in minutes. When using an ATM, again, be aware of your surroundings. If the next person in line is a little too close for comfort, ask for some space before shielding the keypad and entering your PIN, or simply postpone your transaction and move to the back of the line.

Unlike credit cards, which provide some protection to account holders, victims of debit card identity theft can lose a lot more if they fail to notice the theft and act swiftly. The Electronic Fund Transfer Act limits a debit cardholder s liability to $50 if he or she notifies the bank in the first two business days after the card (or information stored on it) is lost or stolen. After two business, the victim can be liable for up to $500 in losses, and if he or she waits 60 days or more to report the loss, the victim might be liable for the entire amount stolen from the account.

Copyright 2017 IdentityHawk

The articles and information available are for educational and reference purposes only. They do not constitute, and should not be construed as, legal or financial advice. Any legal or financial principles discussed here are for general information purposes only and may differ substantially in individual situations and/or in different states or countries. For specific legal or financial advice, please consult a licensed attorney or a financial professional. IdentityHawk does not control or guarantee the accuracy of any information provided through external links from the articles on this website to any other website, nor does the IdentityHawk privacy policy apply to any personal information that may be collected via the external links.

*Identity theft insurance underwritten by subsidiaries or affiliates of Chartis Inc. The description herein is a summary and intended for informational purposes only and does not include all terms, conditions and exclusions of the policies described. Please refer to the actual policies for terms, conditions, and exclusions of coverage. Coverage may not be available in all jurisdictions. View the summary of your benefits. If you cancel your membership in the first 30 days, the insurance coverage will be cancelled as of your original membership start date.

Coverage for residents of New York is limited to a $25,000 maximum. New York residents: view the summary of your benefits .

IdentityHawk provides you with the tools you need to access and monitor your financial/credit information through the program’s credit reporting and monitoring benefits. IdentityHawk provides only limited credit monitoring services which are accessible to its members via the identityhawk.com website. IdentityHawk is not accepting new customers. Credit information provided by TransUnion Interactive, Inc.


How do accidents happen? #road #safety,motoring


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How do accidents happen?

It’s enough to chill your blood on the warmest day. You’re driving along a familiar road on holiday or to work. But your progress is suddenly hampered by ominous signs; an ambulance screeches past and there’s an unexpected traffic jam.

You inch your way to the head of the queue and as you reach the crash scene it’s impossible not to gawp at the tangled metal. You know that within hours, a police notice board seeking witnesses to a fatal accident will appear.

Always though, two haunting questions remain: what went wrong – and how can you make sure it won’t be you next time?

Now, for the first time, a startling new report, Licensed to Skill, has broken down what happens in those mysterious “lost” moments leading to road accidents, analysing who is to blame, what sex or age they tend to be and what they did wrong. Using data gathered by police and spanning 700,000 accidents from 2005-2009, the Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM) has analysed, in breathtaking detail, the anatomy of a road accident.

Unexpected findings emerged, not least the relative unimportance that speeding plays in road accidents that kill six people each day in the UK, leave 68 others seriously hurt and 535 with less serious injuries.

Related Articles

“It has been an eye-opener,” says project manager Neil Greig, of the IAM. “Not just in terms of what causes an accident but in terms of dispelling some of the popular myths. For instance, if you look at Government campaigns they seem to say that speed is the number one problem. But illegal speeding when drivers exceed the posted limit accounts for only 13.9 per cent of fatal accidents. A bigger cause [15.9 per cent] is going too fast for the conditions entering a bend too quickly, for instance when you might well be under the actual speed limit.”

But the biggest cause of road accidents in the UK today? The statistics are quite clear on this and it’s “driver error or reaction”. It’s listed by police as a factor in more than 65 per cent of fatal crashes and the heading covers a multitude of driving sins many of which you’re probably on first-name terms with. Topping the charge sheet is failing to look properly (the Smidsy factor “Sorry mate, I didn’t see you’, relevant in 20.5 per cent of fatals involving driver error), followed by “loss of control” (34 per cent) which, says Greig, often means leaving yourself with “nowhere to go” after entering a bend or other situation, too quickly. Other errors include “poor turn or manoeuvre” (12 per cent) and “failed to judge other person’s path or speed” (11.6 per cent.).

Second biggest cause of fatal accidents, to blame for 31 per cent, is the “injudicious action”, an umbrella term for “travelled too fast for the conditions’ (15.9 per cent of those labelled injudicious), “exceeded speed limit” (13.9 per cent) or “disobeyed give-way or stop sign” (2.1 per cent)?

Third culprit in the daily gamble on who lives and who dies is “behaviour or inexperience” (28 per cent), which covers faults such as “careless, reckless or in a hurry” (17 per cent), “aggressive driving” (8.3 per cent) and “learner/inexperienced” (5.3 per cent).

The fourth main category is “impairment or distraction” (to blame for 19.6 per cent of fatal accidents) covering “alcohol” (a factor in 9.6 per cent of fatal accidents) and “distraction in vehicle” (2.6 per cent).

“What is just as telling though is the factors that, though they might be key in a small number of accidents, aren’t all that significant,” says Greig. “We see a lot of campaigning on issues such as diesel and deposits on the road but that only explains 0.8 per cent of fatal accidents, and being dazzled by headlamps, a factor in 0.4 per dent of fatalities.”

Next time you venture out in bad weather, you might like to reassure yourself that slippery roads only factor in 10.9 per cent of fatal crashes involving road problems, while bad road layouts are to blame in 3.2 per cent.

But you should watch out more carefully for pedestrians. A separate heading shows that “pedestrian only, casualty or injured” accidents account for more than 18 per cent of collisions, with (sound familiar?) 10 per cent of them “failing to look properly”.

Delve further into the report and a colossal range of possible causes of accidents, 77 in all, emerges, including vision affected by the sun, vegetation or spray from vehicles and scratched windscreens. Of those motorists judged by police to have been distracted, only 0.8 per cent were using a mobile phone and 0.4 per cent had defective eyesight.

Other reasons accounting for 6.1 per cent of fatal accidents include “stolen vehicle” (1.1 per cent), “emergency vehicle on call” (0.3 per cent) and “vehicle in course of crime” (0.4 per cent).

Vehicle defects are a factor in only 2.8 per cent of fatals, with tyres mostly to blame (1.5 per cent) followed by dodgy brakes (0.7 per cent).

The overriding message? It’s not your car or the “road conditions” that are most likely to kill you. It’s your own driving. Men are more often ‘careless, reckless or in a hurry’, or ‘travelling too fast for conditions’. Women are more likely to be ‘inexperienced’, but less likely to have been drinking.

Age is a factor. Older drivers more frequently fail to look properly while younger ones are more likely to be going too fast, either for the limit, or the conditions.

Time of day is important; between 7pm-7am ‘loss of control’ is the key factor while at other times, it’s the familiar ‘failed to look properly’. Motorists are more likely to be ‘distracted or impaired’ at weekends (17 per cent) than on weekdays (10 per cent).

“Drivers can learn a lot by reading this and if you take just one thing away from it,” says Greig, “it’s that paying a little more attention, taking that little bit more time to look properly, will save your life. Mostly, crashes aren’t about cars going dramatically out of control and up in smoke. It’s small errors suddenly having greater consequences. But if you are a good, trained driver, you can avoid becoming a statistic.” And you’ll get to that appointment on time, too.

What to do when you have an accident

The AA advises that you:

* Don’t lose your temper even if provoked.

* Don’t admit liability at the scene; you may be confused, and it may adversely affect the claims process

* Call the emergency services you must if anyone is injured

* Call your insurance company who should give you guidance

* Make a note of where you are, road conditions, what happened

* Note other vehicles involved registration numbers, makes, models

* Note who was involved names, telephone numbers, addresses, insurance details

* Make a note of any witnesses who might confirm what happened

* The Highway Code says you must give your details to anyone with reasonable grounds for requiring them. If you don’t you must report details to police within 24 hours

* Take pictures if possible; mobile phones are fine

* If you suspect someone was breaking the law speeding, using a hand-held phone etc tell your insurer and the police

* If you have been injured, deal with your insurer rather than any cold-call lawyers who might contact you


About the LAP-BAND – System #about #lap-band, #weight #loss #system, #gastric #band, #limit #food #intake,


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What is the LAP-BAND ?

Weight Loss Without Invasive Surgery

The LAP-BAND System is a weight loss tool that can help you meet and exceed your weight loss goals. It is a gastric band that helps to limit the amount of food you can eat at once. Through healthy portion control and a healthy lifestyle, you can lose excess weight and keep it off too!

Minimally Invasive

The LAP-BAND System provides a weight loss solution that is minimally invasive. The LAP-BAND gastric band procedure is performed laparoscopically, so you can get back to your weight loss journey quicker.

Long-Term Weight Loss

After all the hard work and dedication that it takes to achieve your goals, you deserve to enjoy your results for years to come. The LAP-BAND program helps with healthy portion control, while care from your team of specialists gives you the techniques to keep the weight off.

An Effective Tool

The LAP-BAND gastric band is a tool that can help you not only achieve your weight loss goals, but exceed them too. You can utilize the benefits of the tool to progress your weight loss and maximize your results, while sticking to a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen.

Why does the LAP-BAND work?

Countless weight loss solutions are available to you. Chances are you may have tried a few of them. Unfortunately, many just didn t deliver the results you were looking for. Time and time again, the feeling of hope has been overcome with disappointment.

So, the question is, why does the LAP-BAND work? It s time to find out how you can change your life with help from the LAP-BAND .

Lose the weight and keep it off with a healthy lifestyle

Would you find it easier to stick to a healthy lifestyle if you weren t constantly hungry? The LAP-BAND System utilizes gastric banding to do just that. A safe and adjustable gastric band helps limit your hunger, ultimately reducing the amount of food you can eat at once. Throughout your aftercare program, you will be encouraged to live a healthy lifestyle with a well-balanced diet and regular exercise. The tools and techniques that you learn throughout the weight loss program will help you to live a long-term healthy lifestyle and keep the weight off for years to come.

Maximize your results with post-procedure support

The LAP-BAND is a tool that can help you lose excess weight, but maximizing your weight loss results by living a healthy lifestyle is up to you. The key to adapting to healthy behaviors is support from the right weight loss clinic. Your team of LAP-BAND specialists will provide you with the knowledge and practices that will help you adapt to a long-lasting healthy lifestyle. Genuine care and support will help you along your journey, especially if you are having a difficult time physically or emotionally. Your team will help you overcome obstacles and ultimately reach your weight loss goals.

DENISE, LOST 115 LBS.

“It feels wonderful knowing that your life has changed for the better .”

An embarrassing moment while at an amusement park with her family was a turning point for Denise. Now, she has a healthy relationship with food and strives to be a strong and healthy role model for her daughters. She has completely changed her life, with help from the LAP-BAND weight loss program.

Find a specialist that fits you.

The key to success with the LAP-BAND is finding the right weight loss clinic. Your team of weight loss specialists will provide you with care and encouragement throughout your weight loss journey. It s important that you find the right weight loss clinic for you.

Find out if you are eligible.

Are you ready to make a change? If you are tired of feeling self-conscious, hiding behind baggy clothing, or not feeling entirely comfortable in your own skin chances are, you re ready. It s important to begin by finding out if the LAP-BAND gastric band will be a safe choice for you.

Important LAP-BAND System Safety Information

Indications: The LAP-BAND System is indicated for weight reduction for patients with obesity, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of at least 40 kg/m 2 or a BMI of at least 30 kg/m 2 with one or more obesity-related comorbid conditions. It is indicated for use only in adult patients who have failed more conservative weight reduction alternatives, such as supervised diet, exercise and behavior modification programs. Patients who elect to have this surgery must make the commitment to accept significant changes in their eating habits for the rest of their lives.

Contraindications: The LAP-BAND System is not recommended for non-adult patients, patients with conditions that may make them poor surgical candidates or increase the risk of poor results (e.g. inflammatory or cardiopulmonary diseases, GI conditions, symptoms or family history of autoimmune disease, cirrhosis), who are unwilling or unable to comply with the required dietary restrictions, who have alcohol or drug addictions, or who currently are or may be pregnant.

Warnings: The LAP-BAND System is a long-term implant. Explant and replacement surgery may be required. Patients who become pregnant or severely ill, or who require more extensive nutrition may require deflation of their bands. Anti-inflammatory agents, such as aspirin, should be used with caution and may contribute to an increased risk of band erosion.

Adverse Events: Placement of the LAP-BAND System is major surgery and, as with any surgery, death can occur. Possible complications include the risks associated with the medications and methods used during surgery, the risks associated with any surgical procedure, and the patient s ability to tolerate a foreign object implanted in the body. Band slippage, erosion and deflation, reflux, obstruction of the stomach, dilation of the esophagus, infection, or nausea and vomiting may occur. Reoperation may be required. Rapid weight loss may result in complications that may require additional surgery. Deflation of the band may alleviate excessively rapid weight loss or esophageal dilation.

Important: For full safety information please click here, talk with your doctor, or call Apollo Customer Support at 1-855-551-3123.

CAUTION: Rx only.

  1. Dixon, et al. Adjustable Gastric Banding and Conventional Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes. JAMA. 2008.
  2. Obesity News Today. (July 7, 2015). Survey Reveals That While Weight Loss Surgery Still Not Common, Gastric Bands Are Most Favored Option. Retrieved from http://obesitynewstoday.com/2015/07/07/consumer-survey-reveals-gastric-surgery-is-not-a-common-choice/.
2017 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. All rights reserved. Any third-party trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

The Monitoring Center – VOIP – Voice Over Internet Protocol #home #security, #home #security #system,


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Calculate Your Savings !

VOIP (Voice Over IP)

The Monitoring Center will attempt to work with your VOIP provider. Please call us FIRST if you are thinking of changing to VOIP.

VOIP is a communication path which uses your internet connection to enable you to place voice calls over internet based networks.

Your alarm system is designed to send signals to the monitoring station over an analog phone line. In order for your alarm system to transmit any emergency signals properly over VOIP, the signal must be converted from analog to digital at the VOIP modem then converted back to analog along the phone network. During this process is where problems may develop. It is possible for data to be lost through this conversion process resulting in errors in the signal at the monitoring station or simply not reach the monitoring station at all.

Your alarm panel comes equipped with a back up battery to power your alarm system in the event of a power failure. Traditional analog land lines will still work during a power failure and the monitoring station will still receive signals properly. With VOIP your phone service will not operate during a power failure, as both your internet router and VOIP modem rely on a constant power source to operate. This prevents any type of signal transmission from your alarm system to the monitoring station.

VOIP services are more prone to “unknown” technical issues and dropped calls. Your alarm panel may be in the process of communicating vital data to the monitoring center when the call is dropped. This will obviously interfere with the communication of the data, or your alarm may communicate data successfully at one time, but will fail at another time for no apparent reason. Some possible explanations of this are fluctuations or low bandwidth from your VOIP provider, inconsistencies with your internet or caller ID blocking which hides your alarm panels’ identity from the monitoring center. Also your VOIP signal quality could possibly be set too low and/or the data package wasn’t turned on.

Similar to a conventional land line your VOIP or Cable based phone line can be cut or disabled by a potential intruder. This stops your alarms ability to communicate with the monitoring center.

At The Monitoring Center we encourage our VOIP customers to add a cellular back up (GSM) unit to their alarm system. This unit will provide a direct link to the monitoring center in the event the communication path (VOIP, cable based phone or land line) is disabled. We also suggest our customers using VOIP to purchase a UPS (Un-interrupted Power Supply) for your internet router and VOIP modem thus supplying power to both modem, and router during power failures.

If you require any further information please feel free to contact our Service Department.

  • E-Mail by completing the quick response in the side bar
  • Or call 1-866-247-4999 Ext 3 then Ext 2 to speak to a member of our Technical Support Team
  • Our Service Department for assistance between the hours of 8:00am and 9:00pm EST Monday through Friday and 9:00am – 4:00pm EST Saturdays

Contact Us


BRC (British Retail Consortium) Global Standard for Food Safety #clothing #retailers


#british retail consortium

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BRC Standards

BRC – Frequently Asked Questions:

What is involved in the certification process?

BRC certification requires a combined on-site document review and facility inspection conducted in the same visit. Audit duration for the average supplier typically requires two days for the onsite visit and an additional 1/2 to 1 day for off-site report writing and corrective action management. Total audit time is determined based on employee count, number of HACCP studies, complexity of processes, and facility square footage.

How long is the certification valid and how often will we be audited?

Audit results are graded based on the type and number of nonconformities cited. A company who achieves either an A or B grade must undergo annual audits of their system to maintain certified status. A company who achieves the minimum passing grade of a C must undergo a six month audit frequency until a higher grade is achieved. Future audits are conducted within the 28 day window prior to the six month or 12 month due date, which is based on the initial certification audit date.

How do we get started?

We highly recommend that you initiate a relationship with your certification body prior to completing the implementation of your system. This will help you plan for the certification process in terms of budgeting and scheduling. As part of the planning process, we also highly recommend a pre-assessment, both to assess your preparedness and to increase your overall chances of passing your initial certification audit the first time.

To purchase copies of the BRC Global Standards please go to: www.brcbookshop.com


BRC (British Retail Consortium) Global Standard for Food Safety #online #discount #coupons


#british retail consortium

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BRC Standards

BRC – Frequently Asked Questions:

What is involved in the certification process?

BRC certification requires a combined on-site document review and facility inspection conducted in the same visit. Audit duration for the average supplier typically requires two days for the onsite visit and an additional 1/2 to 1 day for off-site report writing and corrective action management. Total audit time is determined based on employee count, number of HACCP studies, complexity of processes, and facility square footage.

How long is the certification valid and how often will we be audited?

Audit results are graded based on the type and number of nonconformities cited. A company who achieves either an A or B grade must undergo annual audits of their system to maintain certified status. A company who achieves the minimum passing grade of a C must undergo a six month audit frequency until a higher grade is achieved. Future audits are conducted within the 28 day window prior to the six month or 12 month due date, which is based on the initial certification audit date.

How do we get started?

We highly recommend that you initiate a relationship with your certification body prior to completing the implementation of your system. This will help you plan for the certification process in terms of budgeting and scheduling. As part of the planning process, we also highly recommend a pre-assessment, both to assess your preparedness and to increase your overall chances of passing your initial certification audit the first time.

To purchase copies of the BRC Global Standards please go to: www.brcbookshop.com


BRC (British Retail Consortium) Global Standard for Food Safety #online #coupns


#british retail consortium

#

BRC Standards

BRC – Frequently Asked Questions:

What is involved in the certification process?

BRC certification requires a combined on-site document review and facility inspection conducted in the same visit. Audit duration for the average supplier typically requires two days for the onsite visit and an additional 1/2 to 1 day for off-site report writing and corrective action management. Total audit time is determined based on employee count, number of HACCP studies, complexity of processes, and facility square footage.

How long is the certification valid and how often will we be audited?

Audit results are graded based on the type and number of nonconformities cited. A company who achieves either an A or B grade must undergo annual audits of their system to maintain certified status. A company who achieves the minimum passing grade of a C must undergo a six month audit frequency until a higher grade is achieved. Future audits are conducted within the 28 day window prior to the six month or 12 month due date, which is based on the initial certification audit date.

How do we get started?

We highly recommend that you initiate a relationship with your certification body prior to completing the implementation of your system. This will help you plan for the certification process in terms of budgeting and scheduling. As part of the planning process, we also highly recommend a pre-assessment, both to assess your preparedness and to increase your overall chances of passing your initial certification audit the first time.

To purchase copies of the BRC Global Standards please go to: www.brcbookshop.com