As Plus-Size Fashion Gains Popularity, Retailers Play Catch-Up #music #retailers


#plus size retailers

#

As Plus-Size Fashion Gains Popularity, Retailers Play Catch-Up

Originally published on July 9, 2015 8:30 am

If you’re a woman of a certain size, shopping for clothes can be a downer. Even though the average American woman is around a size 14, most department store racks are devoted to smaller bodies.

But that could be changing.

Plus-size actor Melissa McCarthy is about to launch her own clothing line. Another full-figured actor, Rebel Wilson, is designing one, too. Meghan Trainor’s smash hit “All About That Bass” is all about having more to love, and People magazine made headlines when it recently put size 22 model Tess Holliday on the cover.

There’s a plus-size movement afoot.

“We want more options in clothing and we want more representation of body types in the media,” Holliday said in an interview with NPR’s Here Now. “And I think it would be silly for major designers to not really care about the plus-size consumer, because we have money to spend.”

On a recent afternoon, there was plenty of foot traffic at Torrid in Gaithersburg, Md. It’s a chain known for offering the latest styles in plus sizes. Full-figured mannequins display lacy tank tops, fitted dresses with bold prints and bright colors, and even skinny jeans.

Aviva Copaken, 29, was at Torrid shopping for a new bathing suit. She said it’s the only place she likes to shop.

“It’s got really cute clothes that fit me, and I can just go do what I need to do, pick what I need to pick. And it’s great. It makes me feel normal,” she says.

Shopping just about everywhere else, she says, is exasperating.

“There’s nothing, basically,” she says. “I have no choices, and you feel like a minority.”

And yet she’s not.

“The industry has done a disservice to themselves by not offering some of those great choices for the plus-size consumer,” says Marshal Cohen, NPD retail analyst.

Despite the positive images of full-figured women in popular culture — fashion models, respected movie and TV stars — retail has generally not caught up. Cohen says major clothing stores aren’t eager to make a serious commitment to the plus-size market because it isn’t growing.

“Until the plus-size business grows at a rate greater than its current growth of 2 percent, they are going to wait. And that means that plus size is going to have to accelerate its growth rate closer to 4 and even 5 percent before the retailers are really going to embrace this,” Cohen says.

That neglect has been a gift for those apparel companies, like Torrid, that do embrace plus-size women.

Liz Munoz, senior vice president of design for Torrid, says that when she was growing up, she never found clothes she wanted to wear at the mall, so she learned to both design and sew them herself. Now she’s getting paid to do it.

“I have the very bad retailers and plus size when I was growing up to thank for my career,” she says. “We don’t make tentlike muumuus, which is what I had to face when I was growing up.”

Even veteran plus-size retailer Lane Bryant is trying to be more fashionable. Vogue contributing editor Andre Leon Talley says he was thrilled to see the award-winning designer Isabel Toledo create a range of sophisticated garments for Lane Bryant.

“Trench coats, capri pants, fluid dressing, cocktail dresses that were absolutely wonderful — and it’s on point. It’s anything done for a person who would be wearing a size 8. And I think that probably has taken Lane Bryant in a new direction for its customer,” Talley says.

Many people reading this story might be thinking that a plus-size movement is not a good thing, given all of the very real health concerns around obesity. But Torrid senior designer Munoz says that’s a separate issue.

“We’re not here to encourage people to be bigger. We’re not here to encourage people to be overweight. I think we are addressing the reality of what is going on in our world,” Munoz says.

Online shopping tends to be how most plus-size consumers answer that perennial question: What should I wear? Sites like ModCloth and Simply Be offer more items in more sizes. Analyst Marshal Cohen says even the large department stores have more offerings on their websites than they do on the racks. For a lot of Americans, he says, in-store shopping is not a positive experience.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


Retailers Are Missing Out On A $9 Billion Plus-Size Opportunity – Top Curvy Models #best


#plus size retailers

#

Retailers Are Missing Out On A $9 Billion Plus-Size Opportunity

Plus-size bloggers including Chastity Garner-Valentine were invited to the launch of Lilly Pulitzer for Target in New York City on April 15.

Retailers are largely ignoring plus-size women.

According to IBIS World, the market for plus-size women was worth $9 billion in 2014. The average woman in America is a size 14 (plus sizes are typically between sizes 14 and 34). Yet retailers barely cater to this crucial demographic.

Plus-size women have raised their voices, but that doesn t mean retailers are listening.

Earlier this year, Dana Drew created a petition on Change.org imploring Victoria s Secret to stock its stores with larger sizes.

I love Victoria s Secret so much that I even have their credit card, she wrote on her petition. My money and my credit are good enough for them, but the fact that I can only buy items like perfume, lotion, and body spray sends the message that my body is not. Every year I watch the Angel fashion show and would love to purchase the items I see on my screen but can t because Victoria s Secret doesn t sell plus sizes.

Many retailers send similar messages to plus-size women.

In 2013, Abercrombie was notoriously under fire for not selling XL and XXL women s sizes (the retailer still sold those sizes for men). Abercrombie s former CEO, Mike Jeffries, said he didn t want people wearing his company s clothes if he didn t think they were sexy.

In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids, he told Salon. Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don t belong [in our clothes], and they can t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely.

In 2013, Abercrombie gave in and started to sell larger sizes.

The popular teen retailer Brandy Melville sells only clothes for smaller women. Most of the clothes claim to be one size, but the one size is a small one (the clothes claim to fit size small/medium ).

In a passionate op-ed article in The Daily Trojan, the University of Southern California campus newspaper, student Rini Sampath described the key problem with this strategy.

One size does not fit most, she wrote. According to the Los Angeles Times, the average American woman is a size 14. The crop-tops and miniskirts that litter the shelves of Brandy Melville would barely cover the average American.

If the average American woman is a size 14, retailers are missing out.

Last year, ModCloth conducted a survey with the help of Paradigm Sample to highlight grievances of plus-size-women shoppers.

Unsurprisingly, 92% agreed with the statement I get upset when I can t find cute clothes in my size.

Sixty-five percent of all women agreed with the statement the retail industry ignores the needs of plus-size women. And only 28% of women agreed with the statement plus-size women are included in the fashion community.

More than half of the women sampled called plus-size offerings frumpy and shapeless. Forty-nine percent called the clothing boring.

It s not as if these women make up a sparse demographic. More than 50% of women Paradigm Sample spoke to wore at minimum size 16 in some stores, and more than one-third of the women combined regular and plus-size clothing. To highlight that statistic, Paradigm Sample pointed out that the number of women who wore a size 16 was more than the number of women who wore sizes 0, 2, and 4 combined.

Plus, these women are willing to spend.

Eighty-one percent of women said they would shell out the money if there were more options in their size. Eighty-eight percent said they would buy more clothes if there were trendier options in stores.

And plus-size women actually spend more than straight size women as it stands — 21% of plus-size women spend at minimum $150 a month on clothes and accessories, whereas only 15% of women in standard sizes do the same.

ModCloth notably sells clothing for plus-size women. In fact, when ModCloth was purchasing plus-size clothing from vendors, chief creative officer Susan Koger was confounded at how few vendors were willing to sell plus-size clothing at all. Out of 1,500 vendors she reached out to, only 35 responded.

So why are retailers avoiding an extremely profitable market?

It s likely fear.

This is only speculation, but the reason I would argue that why many non-plus-size designers don t go into plus size is fear, Amanda Czerniawski, sociology professor at Temple University, former plus-size model, and author of Fashioning Fat: Inside Plus-Size Modeling, told Business Insider. Now, there s two dimensions of this fear: It could be fear of [fat, like] Karl Lagerfeld — I don t want to be associated with fat people kind of thing because of the stigma maybe for some it could be this element, but I think overwhelmingly it s a fear of failure.

That failure to create flattering designs for these kinds of different bodies — and part of it is the fact many of these designers, when they go to design school, they re not taught to make clothes for plus-size bodies, she said.

It s fascinating why they re not being taught, why they re not being pushed, because there is such great potential, she added.

Kenyatta Jones, CEO of the clothing line Bella Rene (and a plus-size woman) told Huffington Post Live that the fashion industry had a serious misconception about the way plus-size women behave, and therefore shop, citing the false notion that they don t need clothes, all they do is eat Twinkies.

But some retailers are listening to these women. Target is tapping into this market with its line AVA + VIV, even if the clothing is meh, as Lindsay Louise of Jezebel put it.

There are, however, anomalies. Search plus-size clothing at Bloomingdale s, and clothing from designers such as Michael Kors, Eileen Fisher, and Ralph Lauren will appear.

But what Rachel Pally — of the designer plus-size collection Rachel Pally s White Label — told the Los Angeles Times in 2009 still rings true, based on ModCloth s survey. Fashion-forward plus-size women have no options, she said. They re so thirsty for the product It s like, Hello? Don t you guys want to make money?’ (Further suggesting that plus-size women will spend, in 2009 the Los Angeles Times highlighted that the White Label was one of the top-selling lines at Nordstrom.)

But some major mid-tier retailers do, in fact, sell plus-size clothing. The lingerie retailer Adore Me sells options for plus-size women. Fast-fashion giants Forever 21 and H M sell larger sizes, as well. But as the Los Angeles Times noted, plus size women are mostly restricted to online shopping.

To underscore that notion, plenty of popular brands are, in fact, selling larger sizes online — just not in stores, The Huffington Post reported. It seems as if retailers aren t willing to risk that plus-size women are willing to shop and spend money, even though there is evidence to the contrary.

One solution to solve this problem might be a shift in marketing.

One thing that would vastly improve visibility of the growing plus-size market is if designers who currently offer plus sizes invested more of their resources into publicizing and marketing their lines, offers Nicolette Mason, blogger and contributing fashion editor at Marie Claire, told Fashionista in 2013.


NSFW: Just Gets Better – Plus-size model slams retailers for using slim mannequins #swim #outlet


#plus size retailers

#

LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL – enough already – granted I could just not post this.

Quote: A U.S. size 16 model has slammed plus-size retailers for using models and in-store mannequins considerably smaller than the clothes they sell.

Alex LaRosa, 23, from Los Angeles, California, told the Huffington Post: that while fashion collections usually start at a size 14 they are displayed on dummies as small as a size 8.

She says this causes consumers to suffer from ‘body image issues’ as they set themselves ‘unrealistic expectations.’

I wonder if she ever entertained the idea that the models are based on the size of a normal healthy woman

EDIT: BTW, put a nsfw, or maybe nsf anywhere tag on this at least

Speaking of mannequins.

When I was in high school + college, whenever I was in a store with mannequins, I would have a buddy or girl take pics of me ‘licking’ the tits of mannequins.

Made for a hysterical photo collection, but alas, if they incorporate big boned ones, then I will have to abstain.

I have a feeling they would complain if the mannequins looked like this.

Her dress must be reinforced with carbon fibers to prevent her enormous gut from bursting through. I don’t know if it’s worse when the obese woman’s fat accumulates at the waist or at the hips.

Quote: ‘You’re telling women, “You want to look like these models. This is what you should look like, but it’s never going to happen.”‘
Yup, a moderate amount of daily exercise and decent eating habits are “never going to happen”. I guess this is what their ’empowerment’ is. trying to lower the bar instead of trying to meet it.

(01-15-2014 12:07 PM) Architekt Wrote: I wonder if she ever entertained the idea that the models are based on the size of a normal healthy woman

EDIT: BTW, put a nsfw, or maybe nsf anywhere tag on this at least
Not sure how unsafe for work it is since most people have fat chicks at work. But I was luckily able to edit it before it got locked in.


As Plus-Size Fashion Gains Popularity, Retailers Play Catch-Up #retail #store #lighting


#plus size retailers

#

As Plus-Size Fashion Gains Popularity, Retailers Play Catch-Up

Originally published on July 9, 2015 8:30 am

If you’re a woman of a certain size, shopping for clothes can be a downer. Even though the average American woman is around a size 14, most department store racks are devoted to smaller bodies.

But that could be changing.

Plus-size actor Melissa McCarthy is about to launch her own clothing line. Another full-figured actor, Rebel Wilson, is designing one, too. Meghan Trainor’s smash hit “All About That Bass” is all about having more to love, and People magazine made headlines when it recently put size 22 model Tess Holliday on the cover.

There’s a plus-size movement afoot.

“We want more options in clothing and we want more representation of body types in the media,” Holliday said in an interview with NPR’s Here Now. “And I think it would be silly for major designers to not really care about the plus-size consumer, because we have money to spend.”

On a recent afternoon, there was plenty of foot traffic at Torrid in Gaithersburg, Md. It’s a chain known for offering the latest styles in plus sizes. Full-figured mannequins display lacy tank tops, fitted dresses with bold prints and bright colors, and even skinny jeans.

Aviva Copaken, 29, was at Torrid shopping for a new bathing suit. She said it’s the only place she likes to shop.

“It’s got really cute clothes that fit me, and I can just go do what I need to do, pick what I need to pick. And it’s great. It makes me feel normal,” she says.

Shopping just about everywhere else, she says, is exasperating.

“There’s nothing, basically,” she says. “I have no choices, and you feel like a minority.”

And yet she’s not.

“The industry has done a disservice to themselves by not offering some of those great choices for the plus-size consumer,” says Marshal Cohen, NPD retail analyst.

Despite the positive images of full-figured women in popular culture — fashion models, respected movie and TV stars — retail has generally not caught up. Cohen says major clothing stores aren’t eager to make a serious commitment to the plus-size market because it isn’t growing.

“Until the plus-size business grows at a rate greater than its current growth of 2 percent, they are going to wait. And that means that plus size is going to have to accelerate its growth rate closer to 4 and even 5 percent before the retailers are really going to embrace this,” Cohen says.

That neglect has been a gift for those apparel companies, like Torrid, that do embrace plus-size women.

Liz Munoz, senior vice president of design for Torrid, says that when she was growing up, she never found clothes she wanted to wear at the mall, so she learned to both design and sew them herself. Now she’s getting paid to do it.

“I have the very bad retailers and plus size when I was growing up to thank for my career,” she says. “We don’t make tentlike muumuus, which is what I had to face when I was growing up.”

Even veteran plus-size retailer Lane Bryant is trying to be more fashionable. Vogue contributing editor Andre Leon Talley says he was thrilled to see the award-winning designer Isabel Toledo create a range of sophisticated garments for Lane Bryant.

“Trench coats, capri pants, fluid dressing, cocktail dresses that were absolutely wonderful — and it’s on point. It’s anything done for a person who would be wearing a size 8. And I think that probably has taken Lane Bryant in a new direction for its customer,” Talley says.

Many people reading this story might be thinking that a plus-size movement is not a good thing, given all of the very real health concerns around obesity. But Torrid senior designer Munoz says that’s a separate issue.

“We’re not here to encourage people to be bigger. We’re not here to encourage people to be overweight. I think we are addressing the reality of what is going on in our world,” Munoz says.

Online shopping tends to be how most plus-size consumers answer that perennial question: What should I wear? Sites like ModCloth and Simply Be offer more items in more sizes. Analyst Marshal Cohen says even the large department stores have more offerings on their websites than they do on the racks. For a lot of Americans, he says, in-store shopping is not a positive experience.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


Retailers Are Missing Out On A $9 Billion Plus-Size Opportunity – Top Curvy Models #top


#plus size retailers

#

Retailers Are Missing Out On A $9 Billion Plus-Size Opportunity

Plus-size bloggers including Chastity Garner-Valentine were invited to the launch of Lilly Pulitzer for Target in New York City on April 15.

Retailers are largely ignoring plus-size women.

According to IBIS World, the market for plus-size women was worth $9 billion in 2014. The average woman in America is a size 14 (plus sizes are typically between sizes 14 and 34). Yet retailers barely cater to this crucial demographic.

Plus-size women have raised their voices, but that doesn t mean retailers are listening.

Earlier this year, Dana Drew created a petition on Change.org imploring Victoria s Secret to stock its stores with larger sizes.

I love Victoria s Secret so much that I even have their credit card, she wrote on her petition. My money and my credit are good enough for them, but the fact that I can only buy items like perfume, lotion, and body spray sends the message that my body is not. Every year I watch the Angel fashion show and would love to purchase the items I see on my screen but can t because Victoria s Secret doesn t sell plus sizes.

Many retailers send similar messages to plus-size women.

In 2013, Abercrombie was notoriously under fire for not selling XL and XXL women s sizes (the retailer still sold those sizes for men). Abercrombie s former CEO, Mike Jeffries, said he didn t want people wearing his company s clothes if he didn t think they were sexy.

In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids, he told Salon. Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don t belong [in our clothes], and they can t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely.

In 2013, Abercrombie gave in and started to sell larger sizes.

The popular teen retailer Brandy Melville sells only clothes for smaller women. Most of the clothes claim to be one size, but the one size is a small one (the clothes claim to fit size small/medium ).

In a passionate op-ed article in The Daily Trojan, the University of Southern California campus newspaper, student Rini Sampath described the key problem with this strategy.

One size does not fit most, she wrote. According to the Los Angeles Times, the average American woman is a size 14. The crop-tops and miniskirts that litter the shelves of Brandy Melville would barely cover the average American.

If the average American woman is a size 14, retailers are missing out.

Last year, ModCloth conducted a survey with the help of Paradigm Sample to highlight grievances of plus-size-women shoppers.

Unsurprisingly, 92% agreed with the statement I get upset when I can t find cute clothes in my size.

Sixty-five percent of all women agreed with the statement the retail industry ignores the needs of plus-size women. And only 28% of women agreed with the statement plus-size women are included in the fashion community.

More than half of the women sampled called plus-size offerings frumpy and shapeless. Forty-nine percent called the clothing boring.

It s not as if these women make up a sparse demographic. More than 50% of women Paradigm Sample spoke to wore at minimum size 16 in some stores, and more than one-third of the women combined regular and plus-size clothing. To highlight that statistic, Paradigm Sample pointed out that the number of women who wore a size 16 was more than the number of women who wore sizes 0, 2, and 4 combined.

Plus, these women are willing to spend.

Eighty-one percent of women said they would shell out the money if there were more options in their size. Eighty-eight percent said they would buy more clothes if there were trendier options in stores.

And plus-size women actually spend more than straight size women as it stands — 21% of plus-size women spend at minimum $150 a month on clothes and accessories, whereas only 15% of women in standard sizes do the same.

ModCloth notably sells clothing for plus-size women. In fact, when ModCloth was purchasing plus-size clothing from vendors, chief creative officer Susan Koger was confounded at how few vendors were willing to sell plus-size clothing at all. Out of 1,500 vendors she reached out to, only 35 responded.

So why are retailers avoiding an extremely profitable market?

It s likely fear.

This is only speculation, but the reason I would argue that why many non-plus-size designers don t go into plus size is fear, Amanda Czerniawski, sociology professor at Temple University, former plus-size model, and author of Fashioning Fat: Inside Plus-Size Modeling, told Business Insider. Now, there s two dimensions of this fear: It could be fear of [fat, like] Karl Lagerfeld — I don t want to be associated with fat people kind of thing because of the stigma maybe for some it could be this element, but I think overwhelmingly it s a fear of failure.

That failure to create flattering designs for these kinds of different bodies — and part of it is the fact many of these designers, when they go to design school, they re not taught to make clothes for plus-size bodies, she said.

It s fascinating why they re not being taught, why they re not being pushed, because there is such great potential, she added.

Kenyatta Jones, CEO of the clothing line Bella Rene (and a plus-size woman) told Huffington Post Live that the fashion industry had a serious misconception about the way plus-size women behave, and therefore shop, citing the false notion that they don t need clothes, all they do is eat Twinkies.

But some retailers are listening to these women. Target is tapping into this market with its line AVA + VIV, even if the clothing is meh, as Lindsay Louise of Jezebel put it.

There are, however, anomalies. Search plus-size clothing at Bloomingdale s, and clothing from designers such as Michael Kors, Eileen Fisher, and Ralph Lauren will appear.

But what Rachel Pally — of the designer plus-size collection Rachel Pally s White Label — told the Los Angeles Times in 2009 still rings true, based on ModCloth s survey. Fashion-forward plus-size women have no options, she said. They re so thirsty for the product It s like, Hello? Don t you guys want to make money?’ (Further suggesting that plus-size women will spend, in 2009 the Los Angeles Times highlighted that the White Label was one of the top-selling lines at Nordstrom.)

But some major mid-tier retailers do, in fact, sell plus-size clothing. The lingerie retailer Adore Me sells options for plus-size women. Fast-fashion giants Forever 21 and H M sell larger sizes, as well. But as the Los Angeles Times noted, plus size women are mostly restricted to online shopping.

To underscore that notion, plenty of popular brands are, in fact, selling larger sizes online — just not in stores, The Huffington Post reported. It seems as if retailers aren t willing to risk that plus-size women are willing to shop and spend money, even though there is evidence to the contrary.

One solution to solve this problem might be a shift in marketing.

One thing that would vastly improve visibility of the growing plus-size market is if designers who currently offer plus sizes invested more of their resources into publicizing and marketing their lines, offers Nicolette Mason, blogger and contributing fashion editor at Marie Claire, told Fashionista in 2013.


NSFW: Just Gets Better – Plus-size model slams retailers for using slim mannequins #plus #size


#plus size retailers

#

LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL – enough already – granted I could just not post this.

Quote: A U.S. size 16 model has slammed plus-size retailers for using models and in-store mannequins considerably smaller than the clothes they sell.

Alex LaRosa, 23, from Los Angeles, California, told the Huffington Post: that while fashion collections usually start at a size 14 they are displayed on dummies as small as a size 8.

She says this causes consumers to suffer from ‘body image issues’ as they set themselves ‘unrealistic expectations.’

I wonder if she ever entertained the idea that the models are based on the size of a normal healthy woman

EDIT: BTW, put a nsfw, or maybe nsf anywhere tag on this at least

Speaking of mannequins.

When I was in high school + college, whenever I was in a store with mannequins, I would have a buddy or girl take pics of me ‘licking’ the tits of mannequins.

Made for a hysterical photo collection, but alas, if they incorporate big boned ones, then I will have to abstain.

I have a feeling they would complain if the mannequins looked like this.

Her dress must be reinforced with carbon fibers to prevent her enormous gut from bursting through. I don’t know if it’s worse when the obese woman’s fat accumulates at the waist or at the hips.

Quote: ‘You’re telling women, “You want to look like these models. This is what you should look like, but it’s never going to happen.”‘
Yup, a moderate amount of daily exercise and decent eating habits are “never going to happen”. I guess this is what their ’empowerment’ is. trying to lower the bar instead of trying to meet it.

(01-15-2014 12:07 PM) Architekt Wrote: I wonder if she ever entertained the idea that the models are based on the size of a normal healthy woman

EDIT: BTW, put a nsfw, or maybe nsf anywhere tag on this at least
Not sure how unsafe for work it is since most people have fat chicks at work. But I was luckily able to edit it before it got locked in.