Largest Retail Chains in Asia #coupons #for #retail #stores


#electronic retailers

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Largest Retail Chains in Asia: China, Japan, Taiwan Biggest Retailers

Updated April 27, 2016

When comparing the revenues of the largest retail chains in Asia, the comparison is being drawn between the biggest retail chains in the countries of China. Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Russia, South Korea, Thailand, and Turkey. Even though these Asian countries have some of the largest consumer populations in the world, the retail chains in these countries are not at the top of the World s Largest Retail Companies list compiled and published each year by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and STORES Magazine.

There are two primary reasons for Asia’s lack of dominance in global retailing. First, even though Asian countries contain the most people, those people are not the biggest consumers. The reason they are not the biggest consumers is because they do not possess the greatest individual wealth

This might seem contradictory to the fact that Asian countries have been targeted in recent years by some of the largest luxury retail brands. But in countries like China, Japan, and Russia, there is an extremely wealthy upper class, and an extremely impoverished lower class, and not much middle class in between.

Having said that, the emerging middle class in Asian countries is growing at an accelerated rate, so not only will that create a shift in Asian retailing in general, it will create a different platform from which the largest Asian retail chains can expand both domestically and globally.

The second reason why Asian retail companies are not dominating the global retail landscape is because so much of their consuming is local and decentralized.

Unlike the retail landscape in the U.S. there aren’t massive national retail chains and retail franchises that are duplicated in every city and town of every Asian country.

The cookie cutter chain store void that exists in Asia is not coming so much from Asian based retailers as much as it is starting to be created by the largest U.S. retail chains and European based retailers.

Again, this is particularly true in the luxury retailing sector where Coach, Michael Kors and Tiffany from the U.S. and Gucci, Armani, and Louis Vuitton from Europe have established significant retail presence in high-priced Asian shopping districts.

Of course the 7-11 convenience store chain is the most ubiquitous Asian based retailer in the U.S. In recent years Japan s UNIQLO fashion retail stores have been expanding in major U.S. cities. But for the most part, Asian retailing is found in the car dealerships of auto brands like Nissan, Honda, Hyundai, and Toyota. Between the 2009 list of World’s Largest Retailers and the 2010 list, Asian retailers did not grow significantly larger, and in the case of China, Asian retailing actually dropped substantially in global retail rankings.

Each year a “Global Powers of Retailing” report is compiled by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and STORES Magazine. ranking retailers from all over the world according to total revenue. In 2010, the 13th annual list was released, ranking 250 retailers from 32 different countries.

What follows is the largest retail companies with headquarters in Asia – China, Hong Kong, Japan, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey. (Even though Russia and Turkey are both European and Asian countries, they are included on this Asian list.) This 2010 Global Powers of Retailing list reflects the revenue that was generated in 2009, which was still a year of intense global retailing recession.

This list is archived for historical global retailing and research purposes. Click the links to find more current and up to date information about the World s Largest Retail Chains, as measured by annual revenue.

Largest Retail Companies in Asia:

Hong Kong SAR
Top Global Retail Ranking #53 – AS Watson Company Ltd.

Discount Store, Drug Store/Pharmacy, Electronics Specialty, Hypermarket/Supercenter/Superstore, Other Specialty, Supermarket

Russia
Top Global Retail Ranking #107 – X5 Retail Group N.V.

Convenience/Forecourt Store, Discount Store, Hypermarket/Supercenter/Superstore, Supermarket

South Korea
Top Global Retail Ranking #78 – Lotte Shopping Co. Ltd.

Department Store, Hypermarket/Supercenter/Superstore, Supermarket

Taiwan
Top Global Retail Ranking #187 – President Chain Store Corp.

Convenience/Forecourt Store, Department Store, Drug Store/Pharmacy, Other Specialty, Supermarket

Thailand
Top Global Retail Ranking #209 – CP All

Convenience/Forecourt Store

Turkey
Top Global Retail Ranking #199 – Migros Turk T.A.S.

Discount Store, Hypermarket/Supercenter/Superstore, Supermarket

See also 2011 Largest Asian Retailers

More 2010 Largest Retailers in the World Lists:


Shoe Stores – List of Chains – Online Retailers #retail #market #research


#shoe retailers

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Shoe Stores

By Desiree Stimpert. Shoes Expert

Aldo Shoes: (Online / Retail Locations)
Vendor s Site | Locations | Read More Aldo Shoes carries men s and women s casual and dress shoes, as well as handbags and accessories. Shoe and boot prices range from about $40 to $150. Bakers Shoes: (Online / Retail Locations)
Vendor s Site | Locations | Read More In addition to their own line of shoes and boots, Bakers carries styles from several other popular women s brands. One of my favorite sites to watch for sales, Bakers regular shoe and boot prices range from $40 to $100.

Continue Reading Below

Champs Sports: (Online / Retail Locations)
Vendor s Site | Locations Specializing in athletic footwear, equipment and apparel for women, men and kids, Champs Sports carries merchandise from Nike, Adidas, Saucony, Puma, and most other major athletic brands. DSW Designer Shoe Warehouse: (Online / Retail Locations)
Vendor s Site | Find Locations | Read More

OnlineShoes.com: (Online)
Buy Direct | Read More OnlineShoes.com is one of the most popular online shoe stores, and is home to more than 200 brands, and more than 30,000 styles for women, men and kids.


Top 100 Supermarket Retail Chains 2014 Updated #store #manager


#top 100 retailers

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2014 World’s Largest Grocery Stores, Top 100 Supermarket Retail Chains

Of the 250 World’s Largest Retail chains, 25% of them are classified as strictly being supermarket and grocery store food retailers. That s according to the 2014 Global Powers of Retailing report from Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and STORES Magazine. which is published annually as a global benchmark comparison of the annual revenues of the biggest retail chains of all times.

When taken as a whole, Europe dominates the world s food retailing, with 26 of the largest 63 supermarket companies based in European countries. Only 16 of the largest U.S. based supermarket and grocery store chains have revenues high enough to be ranked alongside the largest retailers in the world.

It s not necessarily just the population numbers that make European and U.S. supermarket and grocery store chains so dominant, it s also the fact that their food industries and distribution systems support large chains, which then put small, independent food retailing competitors out of business. Food retailing in other countries around the world is often more fragmented, disorganized, and not oriented towards large regional and national corporate mega chains.

What follows is the complete list of the 2014 World’s Largest Retail Supermarket and Grocery Store Chains. The number in the left column represents the revenue ranking of the retail chain, compared to the revenue rankings of the 250 largest retail chains of all types included on the 2014 Global Powers of Retailing list.

Click the links for more information about individual supermarket chains and for more World’s Largest Retail ranking information.

2014 World s Largest Grocery Stores, Top 100 Global Supermarket Retail Chains:

5 The Kroger Company

17 Woolworths Ltd.
Australia


7 Layout Secrets of the Big Retail Chains #retail #sales #assistant


#retail store design

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7 Layout Secrets of the Big Retail Chains

Ever walked into a big chain store and walked out with way more than you had planned to purchase? Big retailers certainly seem to know how to design their stores and create tempting displays to keep us shopping.

What s their secret? Here are seven layout tips from experts who have worked with many major retailers.

1. Make windows shine. Many small retailers don t do window displays, letting customers simply look straight into the shop. That s a mistake, says store design and display consultant Linda Cahan of Cahan Co. in West Linn, Ore. Just like your eyes are the windows of your soul, store windows are the eyes of the store, she says. Each window should tell a story.

To create an appealing display, use a single color theme to grab attention and communicate your store s image. It s also important to avoid clutter because in retailing, space equals luxury, Cahan says. If you cram items together in a window, they ll look cheap. Think of how Tiffany displays just a few items in the window, communicating that they are special.

2. Make an arresting first impression. When customers enter your store, an eye-catching display up front should make them slow down. Otherwise, they may hurry on through the store and buy little. Notice how Costco sets up large seasonal displays at its entrances, often with a product pulled out of its box — a kitchen appliance or fresh plants — that shoppers can stop to touch, smell or try.

One problem in many small stores is a high rack up front that blocks views of the rest of the shop. If customers don t like what they see on that first set of shelves, they might leave. Instead, use lower shelving units with shorter pegs and narrower shelves. This makes the store look full without having to stock too much merchandise, as well as allows customers to see farther into the shop, says Pat Johnson, co-owner of the Seattle-based consulting firm Outcalt Johnson: Retail Strategists .

3. Steer customers to the right. Retailers should design their stores to draw shoppers to the right side of the entryway. Studies have shown that most people naturally look first left, then right as they enter a store, says Brian Dyches, chief experience officer of retail branding firm Ikonic Tonic in Los Angeles. Shoppers usually then prefer to move right and walk counter-clockwise around the store.

For instance, enter a Safeway grocery store in the chain s upscale Marketplace format, and your eye is drawn to the floral department on the right. The bright colors and floral scents remind shoppers of happy times in their lives, Dyches says, both putting them in a good mood and encouraging them to move right and begin walking the store counter-clockwise

At 136-year-old Hermann Furniture in Brenham, Texas, visitors enter a foyer dominated by a round table of seasonal merchandise. Shoppers must pause at the table and decide how to navigate around it. A wider aisle on the right encourages them to move around the table in that direction.

4. Lead them somewhere. Often, small retailers fail to put a compelling display at the end of an aisle, says store designer Cahan. They create an aisle that ends at nothing, either a back wall or a stockroom or the bathroom.

Instead, Dyches says, retailers might use a long aisle to lead customers to a new department laid out perpendicular to other racks.

5. Have an angle. While it s most efficient to lay out aisles parallel to the store s exterior walls, retailers can create more visual interest by placing them at an angle, Cahan says. Ideally, aisles could angle in from both sides to a central aisle, forming an arrow layout that ends in a back-wall display. But only take an angular approach if you can keep aisles wide enough for customers to navigate easily.

6. Create breaks. In studying shopping patterns with his clients, Dyches says he finds that up to 20 percent of the store s merchandise is skipped over. That s because long, uninterrupted aisles don t get people s attention.

Take a page from Wal-Mart and other big-box retailers: Create stopping points in the middle of long aisles, such as signs or displays that create a visual break. Dyches likes how clothing chain Anthropologie often repeats a design behind wall displays and then changes or ends the pattern to try to get customers to stop at a special display.

7. Offer hugs. People are attracted to round and U-shapes, Dyches says. To get shoppers to stop at a display, try hanging a circular sign from the ceiling or placing a U-shaped background, such as a low wall with small sides extending forward, behind it. These make people want to stop and enter the space, which resembles a person extending their arms for a hug. Nordstrom makes great use of this technique in apparel displays, putting U-shaped partial walls behind mannequins on some displays, Dyches says.

Low-Cost Ways to Improve Your Layout

On a tight budget? Consider these tips to begin improving your layout.

  • Ask key employees and your best customers to walk through the store and offer feedback, says Dick Outcalt, co-owner of Outcalt Johnson, which offers a questionnaire designed to help pinpoint trouble spots. Another approach is to take photos of your store, then gather staff for an analysis.
  • Look for affordable help to make the changes you decide on if store design and merchandising aren t your forte. You might share the services and costs of a design professional with several nearby retailers, for instance, or hire a college student from a merchandising or marketing program who might work for minimum wage or just course credit, says Cahan.
  • To make low-cost displays, collect cheap decorative items that can be repainted and reused to fit different themes and seasons. Such items include empty picture frames, old watering cans and wooden chairs that can serve as shelving. All of those can be picked up at yard sales or from closeout bins at craft stores, Cahan says.
  • Don t consider it a finished job once you ve made your changes. You need to change displays regularly to give customers a fresh experience every time they shop. There s never an area where we don t change things nearly every day, says Jennifer Hermann, owner of Hermann Furniture. That s fun, and makes customers want to buy.

Copyright 2016 Entrepreneur Media, Inc. All rights reserved.


Biggest and Best Canadian Retail Chains #clothing #retailers


#top retailers

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2013 World’s Largest Canada Retailers

Updated September 19, 2016

See also. What is the Largest Single Retail Store in the World?

In general, Canadian retailing is gaining on the global retailing stage in terms of the revenue of the largest Canadian retail chains. In the past two years all of the largest Canadian retailers have improved their rankings on the annual Global Powers of Retailing list published by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and STORES Magazine. The increases for the biggest and best Canadian retailers have been slow and steady for the most part, but the trend has definitely been upwards.

In the most recent statistics provided by the Canadian government, retail trade contributed 76.9 billion to Canada’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), surpassing the contribution of wholesale trade, which was $71.1 billion in that same time period (2011). There are approximately 1.8 million people employed by the Canadian retail industry, and employment by electronics and appliance stores has seen the biggest increases, along with employment with non-store (Internet based, for example) retailers.

Canada’s retail industry struggled during the critical December holiday shopping season in 2012, falling 2.1% when compared with same time period in 2011. This could be due to a consumer spending pull back, but it could also have something to do with the growing presence of international retailers, particularly via Internet channels. Of 10 largest Internet shopping sites used by Canadians, only two of them – Chapters/Indigo and The Source – are Canadian retail companies.

Seven of the ten most popular retail shopping websites in Canada are based in the U.S. according to reports by the Huffington Post.

One exception to the slow-and-steady upward trending of Canadian retail companies is home improvement company RONA, which has made a meteoric rise on the global retail rankings, flying past Canadian legacy retail chain Hudson’s Bay Company and the Liquor Control Board in the two years after it first achieved a ranking on the World’s Largest Retailer list.

Between the 2012 and 2013 Global Powers of retailing, RONA rose 47 positions in the World’s Largest Retailing ranks, thanks to some acquisitions in 2010, and a $1.35 billion increase in retail sales.

In that same period there were some significant changes in the global revenue rankings of other Canadian retail chains, although much less dramatic than the RONA rise. Canada’s largest retail chain, Loblaw hypermarkets nudged rose 8 ranking positions in just one year, almost breaking into the Top 30, which is not insignificant. In that same one year period, Canada’s largest grocery store chain. Sobey’s, fell four positions in the global retail ranks, losing ground to Italy’s largest supermarket chain, Coop Italia. To put things into perspective, both Sobey’s and Coop Italia are smaller than H-E-B, which is only #5 on the Largest U.S. Supermarkets ranking list.

Canadian Tire rose 11 positions in the global retail rankings between the 2012 and 2013 Global Powers of Retailing reports. Drugstore and pharmacy chain Katz made the most significant strides in that one-year period as well, rising 25 position in the global retail rankings to become one of the top 150 retail chains in the world.

What follows is a complete list of the largest Canadian retail chains ranked on the 2013 Global Powers of Retailing list. The number next to each company name represents the revenue ranking of the retail company (based on 2011 revenue figures), compared to 250 other world s largest retailers on the Global Powers list.

World s Largest Canada Retailers 2013 – Canadian Retailing Compared to the Top 250 Retail Companies in the World by Annual Revenue:


Biggest and Best Retail Chains in China #retail #consultants


#china retail

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Biggest and Best Retail Chains in China

Updated September 22, 2016

Getting a strong foothold as a major retail player with the consumers of China is the 21st century gold rush for retailers around the world. The enormity of China s population is attractive enough but coupled with increasing wages and good employment prospects, the frenzy of activity from global retail companies is making China one of the most competitive retail markets on the planet.

Overall, the economic growth in China has been greatly improving and expanding at a time when the U.S. and European economies have been struggling just to maintain stability after the contraction of the Great Recession.

China s economic growth in 2010 was 10.3% and in 2011 was 9.2%, according to the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS). The Chinese Academy of Sciences have predicted an 8.5% increase in economic growth for China in 2012.

For the first time in 2011, there were more Chinese citizens living in China s cities than in its rural areas. This, of course, makes retail customers easier to reach. This might account for the 17.3% year-over-year growth in retail sales in November, 2011 and the 18.1% year-over-year growth in December, 2011.

While China is obviously a fertile retail market for international retailers and global flagship stores. it is also a difficult market because Chinese consumers have demonstrated a preference for and a loyalty to retailers that are native China-based companies. Apparently Made in China doesn t have any derogatory connotations when you live and shop in China. Even so, there aren t many Chinese retail chains that are dominant enough at home or abroad to qualify for the annual World s Largest Retailers List .

What follows is a complete list of the China-based retail chains considered to be among the largest retailers in the world, according to annual revenue. The number in the left column is the global ranking number assigned to the company, based on its sales figures, compared to other top retail organizations worldwide on the 2011 Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and STORES Magazine Global Powers of Retailing List.


The Five Largest Coffee Shop Chains On Earth #retail #finance


#coffee retailers

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The Five Largest Coffee Shop Chains On Earth

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Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. The world consumes over 2.25 billion cups of coffee a day, and it has become one of the world’s most important commodities. Brazil is one of the largest producers of green coffee, with over five million Brazilians working in the coffee-related industry. Coffee is so critical to many economies in the world that is also publicly traded in the market. More than half of the Western-world drinks coffee on a daily basis. For many local restaurants and convenience stores, coffee represents over 80% of their hot beverage sales.

Coffee typically costs a retailer 20 cents per cup, and they in turn resell that to consumers for at least four to five times that amount. Prices vary depending on multiple factors, including store ambiance, flavor, bean, roast, and store location. A regular cup of coffee can range from $1 to $5. Specialty coffees such as cappuccinos and lattes can be as pricey as $7 a cup. Small coffee chains can earn revenues as high as $2 million.

Often, coffee shop owners will own multiple stores as a means to grow their wealth. Many coffee shop owners insist that service and convenience are key drivers in increasing coffee sales. Owners will use take-out counters and drive-thrus to drive sales and reduce the need for tables and chairs.

Despite coffee’s global demand, the competition for coffee producers and coffee shops is incredibly tough. Even the leading coffee shop chains are challenged in their efforts to improve the coffee buying and drinking experience. More and more coffee shops open daily across the globe, and major corporate coffee chains have used emerging markets to grow their business. In the last few years, coffee shop chains have even developed smartphone apps to make coffee purchasing easy and seamless.

Coffee’s future is not dark at the very least, but rather bright and full of promise as competitors chomp at each other for a slice of the market share. Here are the world’s top 5 coffee shop chains.

McCafe -1,300 Locations



Gold Chains – 14k Gold Chains – 18k Gold Chains – Wedding Bands – Sarraf


#jewelry retailers

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Gold Chains | Gold Jewelry | Wedding Bands

Shop Sarraf.com for gold chains and much more. With great prices and great service, Sarraf.com will provide you with the finest gold chains, diamond jewelry, wedding bands, gold watches, gold earrings, and other stunning gold jewelry selections. Sarraf also offers quality jewelry in a wide selection of platinum and sterling silver. Our exquisite and timeless gold and sterling silver jewelry collection is sure to entice even the most discriminating buyer.

A Trusted Source of Gold Jewelry

Sarraf offers premium gold chains and gold jewelry. Sarraf doesn’t sell any gold-plated or gold-filled jewelry. We are an online jewelry store you can trust to provide you with only top quality gold chains, gold rings, pendants, earrings and necklaces. With a national reputation for delivering great customer service, Sarraf will satisfy your jewelry needs. At our online jewelry store, Sarraf.com, you will shop for hours viewing all the products we have to offer. In addition to popular traditional gold chains and gold jewelry styles ,we also feature unique items that you won’t find just anywhere, and superior craftsmanship that is sure to leave a lasting impression. Whether you are looking for a high quality gold chain, a sterling silver bracelet, elegant diamond earrings, or searching for the perfect wedding bands,Sarraf.com is your one stop online jewelry store.

Sarraf Jewelry

Sarraf Jewelry, Inc. was Established in 1986, by company founders who hold over 50 years of experience in the jewelry industry. Sarraf.com was launched on the web in1997 and currently offers more than 20,000 products at competitive prices .Our website also supplies visitors with a wealth of jewelry related information. Sarraf Jewelry is committed to the utmost in customer satisfaction and excellence in price and quality.


Top 50 North American Retail Chains #jobs #retail


#jewelry retailers

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Top 50 North American Retail Chains

1. ZALE CORP.
901 W. Walnut Hill Lane, Irving, TX 75038
Phone: 972-580-4000 Fax: 972-580-5547

Sales:
$1,742,563,000 (2011)
$1,616,305,000 (2010)
$1,779,744,000 (2009)

2. STERLING JEWELERS INC.
U.S. subsidiary of Signet Jewelers Ltd. (Bermuda)
375 Ghent Rd. Akron, OH 44333
Phone: 330-668-5000 Fax: 330-668-5191
1,318 units

Sales (U.S.):
$3,034,100,000 (2011)
$2,744,200,000 (2010)
$2,540,400,000 (2009)

3. FRED MEYER JEWELERS
Subsidiary of Kroger Co.
3800 S.E. 22nd Ave. Portland, OR 97202
Phone: 503-232-8844 Fax: 503-797-7616
338 units*

4. HELZBERG DIAMONDS
Owned by Berkshire Hathaway
1825 Swift Ave. North Kansas City, MO 64116
Phone: 816-842-7780 Fax: 816-842-0847
229 units

5. ULTRA STORES INC.
122 South Michigan Ave. Suite 800, Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 312-922-3800 Fax: 312-922-3933
150 units*

6. SAMUELS JEWELERS
Owned by Gitanjali USA
2914 Montopolis Dr. Suite 200, Austin, TX 78741
Phone: 512-369-1400 Fax: 512-369-1500
106 units

7. TIFFANY CO.
727 Fifth Ave. New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-755-8000 Fax: 212-230-6996
87 units (U.S. only)Sales:*
$1,805,783,000 (2011)
$1,574,571,000 (2010)
$1,410,845,000 (2009)

8. ROGERS ENTERPRISES
20821 Cicero Ave. Matteson, IL 60443
Phone: 708-748-6400 Fax: 708-747-3820
78 units

9. (tie) BEN BRIDGE JEWELER
A Berkshire Hathaway Company
P.O. Box 1908, Seattle, WA 98111
Phone: 206-448-8800 Fax: 206-448-7456
75 units

9. (tie) DON ROBERTO
1020 Calle Recodo, San Clemente, CA 92673-6225
Phone: 949-361-6700 Fax: 949-498-8917
75 units

11. (tie) CHARM JEWELRY LTD.
140 Portland Street, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada B2Y 1J1
Phone: 902-463-7177 Fax: 902-466-5472
69 units

11. (tie) NA HOKU INC.
3049 Ualena St. Honolulu, HI 96819
Phone: 808-833-7772 Fax: 808-837-1358
69 units

13. REEDS JEWELERS
P.O. Box 2229, Wilmington, NC 28401
Phone: 910-350-3100 Fax: 910-350-3353
66 units

14. (tie) JAMES AVERY CRAFTSMAN
145 Avery Rd. North, Kerrville, TX 78028
Phone: 830-895-1122 Fax: 830-895-6601
64 units

14. (tie) SHERWOOD MANAGEMENT CO.
P.O. Box 3750, Culver City, CA 90231
Phone: 310-665-2100 Fax: 310-665-2101
64 units*

16. BEN MOSS JEWELLERS
300-201 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3B 3K6
Phone: 204-947-6682 Fax: 204-988-0148
63 units

17. BIRKS MAYORS INC.
1240 Phillips Square, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3B 3H4
Phone: 514-397-2511 Fax: 514-397-25775870 North Hiatus Road, Tamarac, FL 33321
Phone: 954-590-9000 Fax: 954-590-9299
60 units

Sales:
$270,948,000 (2011)
$255,057,000 (2010)
$270,896,000 (2009)

18. HANNOUSH JEWELERS
1655 Boston Rd. Unit B7, Springfield, MA 01129
Phone: 413-439-2830 Fax: 413-439-0073
58 units*

19. (tie) MAUI DIVERS OF HAWAII
1520 Liona St. Honolulu, HI 96814
Phone: 808-946-7979 Fax: 808-946-0406
53 units

21. TOURNEAU
Owned by Green Equity Investors IV
3 E. 54th St. New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-758-6022 Fax: 212-308-9145
35 units

22. (tie) CARTIER
Division of Richemont North America
645 Fifth Ave. New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-753-0111 Fax: NA
33 units*

22. (tie) MOVADO GROUP INC.
650 From Rd. Suite 375, Paramus, NJ 07652
Phone: 201-267-8000 Fax: 201-267-8070
33 units

24. HARRY RITCHIE’S JEWELERS
956 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 97401
Phone: 541-686-1787 Fax: 541-485-8841
30 units

25. KING’S OF NEW CASTLE
2650 Ellwood Rd. Suite 141 A, New Castle, PA 16101
Phone: 724-654-5531 Fax: 724-654-5814
26 units

26. HARRIS ORIGINALS
800 Prime Place, Hauppauge, NY 11788
Phone: 631-348-0303 Fax: 631-348-0719
21 units

27. SHANE CO.
P.O. Box 3552, Englewood, CO 80155
Phone: 303-792-3500 Fax: 303-792-0340
20 units

28. MORGAN MANAGEMENT
P.O. Box 45820, Salt Lake City, UT 84145-0820
Phone: 801-328-8511 Fax: 801-924-1930
18 units

29. (tie) BULGARI CORPORATION OF AMERICA
Owned by LVMH
625 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-315-9000 Fax: NA
16 units

29. (tie) FINK’S JEWELERS
P.O. Box 12906, Roanoke, VA 24029
Phone: 540-344-8697 Fax: 540-343-1570
16 units

29. (tie) GOLDENWEST DIAMOND CORP.
15732 Tustin Village Way, Tustin, CA 92780
Phone: 714-542-9000 Fax: 714-542-0221
16 units

29. (tie) SASLOW’S
PO Box 14189, Greensboro, NC 27415
Phone: 336-375-1440 Fax: 336-375-1167
16 units

29. (tie) VAN CLEEF ARPELS
744 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10019
Phone: 212-644-9500 Fax: 212-265-0036
16 units*

34. JENSEN JEWELERS
133 Shoshone Street N. Twin Falls, ID 83301
Phone: 208-734-7933 Fax: 208-734-9574
15 units

35. (tie) DEVONS JEWELERS
1910 29th St. Sacramento, CA 95816
Phone: 916-451-6583 Fax: 916-452-3704
14 units

35. (tie) ROSS-SIMONS JEWELERS
9 Ross-Simons Dr. Cranston, RI 02920
Phone: 401-463-3100 Fax: 401-463-8599
14 units

37. (tie) C.R. JEWELERS
4010 Oak Circle, Boca Raton, FL 33431
Phone: 561-338-8411 Fax: 561-338-8294
12 units*

37. (tie) POLLACK CORP.
600 Roundwood Dr. Scarborough, ME 04074
Phone: 207-883-8455 Fax: 207-883-1012
12 units

37. (tie) ROBBINS BROTHERS, THE ENGAGEMENT RING STORE
Owned by Weston Presidio
P.O. Box 0517, Azusa, CA 91702
Phone: 800-295-1543 Fax: 626-224-9417
12 units

40. THE JEWELERS INC.
2400 Western Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89102
Phone: 702-382-7411 Fax: 702-382-3307
11 units

41. (tie) DE BEERS DIAMOND JEWELLERS

Joint venture between De Beers Group and LVMH

20 W. 55th St. 7th Fl. New York, NY 10019

Phone: 212-751-2000 Fax: 212-246-3860

41. (tie) MICHAELS
P.O. Box 7388, Prospect, CT 06712
Phone: 203-597-4942 Fax: 203-597-4990
10 units*

41. (tie) REEDS JEWELERS
150 Creekside Dr. Amherst, NY 14228
Phone: 716-688-7790 Fax: 716-688-6824
10 units

44. (tie) BRODKEY BROTHERS
12165 West Center Rd. Ste 73, Omaha, NE 68144
Phone: 402-330-9800 Fax: 402-697-0603
9 units

44. (tie) HARRY WINSTON INC.
Division of Harry Winston Diamond Corp.
718 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10019
Phone: 212-245-2000 Fax: 212-581-2612
9 units

44. (tie) MICHAEL HILL JEWELER
Subsidiary of Michael Hill International Ltd.
835 Michigan Ave. Water Tower Place, Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312-642-6775 Fax: 312-642-6995
9 units

44. (tie) ROGERS JEWELRY CO.
P.O. Box 3151, Modesto, CA 95353
Phone: 209-578-1873 Fax: 209-578-1409
9 units

48. (tie) LEE MICHAELS FINE JEWELERS
11314 Cloverland Ave. Baton Rouge, LA 70809
Phone: 225-291-9094 Fax: 225-293-2021
8 units

48. (tie) LUX BOND GREEN
P.O. Box 330250, West Hartford, CT 06133
Phone: 860-521-3015 Fax: 860-561-1111
8 units

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Largest Retail Chains in Asia #online #shop


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Largest Retail Chains in Asia: China, Japan, Taiwan Biggest Retailers

Updated April 27, 2016

When comparing the revenues of the largest retail chains in Asia, the comparison is being drawn between the biggest retail chains in the countries of China. Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Russia, South Korea, Thailand, and Turkey. Even though these Asian countries have some of the largest consumer populations in the world, the retail chains in these countries are not at the top of the World s Largest Retail Companies list compiled and published each year by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and STORES Magazine.

There are two primary reasons for Asia’s lack of dominance in global retailing. First, even though Asian countries contain the most people, those people are not the biggest consumers. The reason they are not the biggest consumers is because they do not possess the greatest individual wealth

This might seem contradictory to the fact that Asian countries have been targeted in recent years by some of the largest luxury retail brands. But in countries like China, Japan, and Russia, there is an extremely wealthy upper class, and an extremely impoverished lower class, and not much middle class in between.

Having said that, the emerging middle class in Asian countries is growing at an accelerated rate, so not only will that create a shift in Asian retailing in general, it will create a different platform from which the largest Asian retail chains can expand both domestically and globally.

The second reason why Asian retail companies are not dominating the global retail landscape is because so much of their consuming is local and decentralized.

Unlike the retail landscape in the U.S. there aren’t massive national retail chains and retail franchises that are duplicated in every city and town of every Asian country.

The cookie cutter chain store void that exists in Asia is not coming so much from Asian based retailers as much as it is starting to be created by the largest U.S. retail chains and European based retailers.

Again, this is particularly true in the luxury retailing sector where Coach, Michael Kors and Tiffany from the U.S. and Gucci, Armani, and Louis Vuitton from Europe have established significant retail presence in high-priced Asian shopping districts.

Of course the 7-11 convenience store chain is the most ubiquitous Asian based retailer in the U.S. In recent years Japan s UNIQLO fashion retail stores have been expanding in major U.S. cities. But for the most part, Asian retailing is found in the car dealerships of auto brands like Nissan, Honda, Hyundai, and Toyota. Between the 2009 list of World’s Largest Retailers and the 2010 list, Asian retailers did not grow significantly larger, and in the case of China, Asian retailing actually dropped substantially in global retail rankings.

Each year a “Global Powers of Retailing” report is compiled by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and STORES Magazine. ranking retailers from all over the world according to total revenue. In 2010, the 13th annual list was released, ranking 250 retailers from 32 different countries.

What follows is the largest retail companies with headquarters in Asia – China, Hong Kong, Japan, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey. (Even though Russia and Turkey are both European and Asian countries, they are included on this Asian list.) This 2010 Global Powers of Retailing list reflects the revenue that was generated in 2009, which was still a year of intense global retailing recession.

This list is archived for historical global retailing and research purposes. Click the links to find more current and up to date information about the World s Largest Retail Chains, as measured by annual revenue.

Largest Retail Companies in Asia:

Hong Kong SAR
Top Global Retail Ranking #53 – AS Watson Company Ltd.

Discount Store, Drug Store/Pharmacy, Electronics Specialty, Hypermarket/Supercenter/Superstore, Other Specialty, Supermarket

Russia
Top Global Retail Ranking #107 – X5 Retail Group N.V.

Convenience/Forecourt Store, Discount Store, Hypermarket/Supercenter/Superstore, Supermarket

South Korea
Top Global Retail Ranking #78 – Lotte Shopping Co. Ltd.

Department Store, Hypermarket/Supercenter/Superstore, Supermarket

Taiwan
Top Global Retail Ranking #187 – President Chain Store Corp.

Convenience/Forecourt Store, Department Store, Drug Store/Pharmacy, Other Specialty, Supermarket

Thailand
Top Global Retail Ranking #209 – CP All

Convenience/Forecourt Store

Turkey
Top Global Retail Ranking #199 – Migros Turk T.A.S.

Discount Store, Hypermarket/Supercenter/Superstore, Supermarket

See also 2011 Largest Asian Retailers

More 2010 Largest Retailers in the World Lists: