The real reason our shops are shutting up, british retail consortium.#British #retail #consortium


The real reason our shops are shutting up

British retail consortium

British retail consortium

8:19PM BST 28 May 2013

Another day, another report on the death of the high street. According to the Centre for Retail Research, the number of shops in Britain is predicted to fall by more than a fifth by 2018, blighting our town centres and suburban malls with a further 60,000 boarded-up stores. We are, it says, facing a crisis .

This is certainly true but one of the main problems when it comes to fixing it is that we re blaming the wrong things. The usual culprits suggested are the march of the big supermarket chains, the state of the economy, and above all the growth of the internet. Even the biggest names in retail are not immune: last week, Marks Spencer said that it won t build any more clothes stores in the UK after 2016, as sales migrate online. And the mighty Tesco has said that it is ditching more than 100 empty plots of land that it had jealously and expensively acquired to build giant hypermarkets , and will instead focus on the internet.

Certainly, the web has its part to play, as does the flatlining state of consumer spending. Yet according to retailers themselves, the biggest single reason why so many shops are closing down is because of rising financial demands from government, in the form of business taxes, and from landlords, in the form of rent.

Take Clapham Books, the sort of shop that every high street needs. Friendly, independent and so plugged into the community that it deserves its own seat on the council, this south London bookshop is being forced to close at the end of the summer and look for cheaper premises elsewhere. If people see an independent bookshop closing they assume it s because of Amazon and e-books, says Ed McGarry, the shop s manager. But it s not. You can figure ways around all those things. It s about rising rent and business rates.

In Clapham Books s case, a recent increase proposed by the landlord means that its rent will have quadrupled in 15 years. The same is happening all over the country. According to the British Retail Consortium, the overall cost of doing business for shopkeepers has risen from £96 billion to £116 billion since 2006. Looked at another way, costs have risen by 21 per cent against a sales increase of just 12 per cent. Even where rents have remained static, or fallen (as the British Property Federation claims they generally have), there s still the problem of business rates. These are partially set using that pernicious tool of government revenue-generation, the multiplier , adjusted every April in line with the previous September s inflation figure. So this year, rates rose by 2.8 per cent, adding £175 million to retailers bills overnight.

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Of course, the internet is playing its part in the changing retail landscape. By 2018, a fifth of all sales will be online, and retailers of all sizes are being forced to adapt to ensure their long-term survival. As part of its reinvention, Tesco will not only focus on internet sales, but open more smaller shops. It also recently acquired Giraffe, the family restaurant chain, in recognition that its future is about giving people a day out rather than just luring them to a big shed full of products.

John Lewis, meanwhile, is offering consumers increasingly flexible ways to shop: goods ordered online can be collected in department stores or branches of Waitrose, while shoppers can return online purchases of clothes and shoes at a network of 5,000 convenience stores and petrol stations across the UK. Hotel Chocolat, the fast-growing confectionery chain, has gone down the fine wine route. It is engaging shoppers by putting labels on its bars that show the terroir , including the year of the harvest and the amount of time the beans spent roasting. It also raised £3.7 million by launching a bond whereby investors were repaid in bimonthly deliveries of chocolate.

In fact, all retailers are having to be increasingly inventive about how they think with some wonderful results. I was a judge for The Bookseller s awards earlier this month, in which dozens of retailers proved that the high street can still be a vibrant place. One small bookshop Linghams in the Wirral is so good at putting on events and editing its range to local tastes that a nearby branch of Tesco directs shoppers to it. And two years ago an entrepreneur called Amarjeet Singh opened 98p+ shops opposite Poundland branches, undercutting them by 2p.

Britain remains a nation of shopkeepers ones with enough ideas to see the high street through its current crisis, even if in altered form. But for that to happen, ministers and landlords need to stop wringing their hands about the internet, and start cutting the crippling costs that retailers are forced to pay.


Online Retail Sales Slip for First Time in Months – WWD, online retail sales.#Online #retail


Online Retail Sales Slip for First Time in Months

Online retail sales

Shutterstock / Solis Images

After a brief reprieve, retail sales slipped in August, surprisingly led by declines in online sales. Seasonally adjusted sales for apparel and accessories retailers fell 1 percent in August to $21.62 billion, compared to July, when month-over-month sales increased 0.5 percent to $21.83 billion. But compared with a year ago, sales in the sector were up 0.5 percent, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Department store sales fell 0.1 percent to $12.65 billion during the month, after rising 0.9 percent and hitting $21.83 billion in July. The performance in August was better than a year ago, when department store sales were down 0.8 percent. Breaking from the growth trend of recent years, sales at non-store retailers, a category that includes web sites and mail order houses, also fell in August, by 1.1 percent to $51.71 billion. In July non-store sales rose 1.8 percent to $52.28 billion and in August 2016, sales grew 8.4 percent. Sales at non-store retailers are still growing much faster than those for apparel retailers. Since last August, non-store sales are up 10.5 percent while sales for specialty and department stores are down 2.8 percent combined. Overall retail sales fell by 0.2 percent to $489.85 billion in August after a 0.3 percent increase in July, but year-over-year sales are up 3.2 percent. Charlie O’Shea, lead retail analyst at Moody’s Investor Service, said the August numbers show “a mixed bag, with the month-over-month drop indicative of a still-choppy environment for the U.S. consumer.” As for whether Hurricanes Harvey and Irma that have battered the southwest and southeast in recent weeks affected the monthly sales numbers, the Census Bureau said it doesn’t break out numbers by geographic location and that its data collection was generally uninterrupted. “While a few individual firms reported large increases or decreases in their sales because of the effects of the hurricane, this additional variation was not large enough to substantially affect the reliability of the published estimates,” the bureau said. James Bohnaker, associate director of economic research firm IHS Markit, said in a note that the August numbers no doubt showed “the early effects” of Harvey, but he expects “to see some payback once hurricane effects dissipate.” “The bigger story is that consumer spending looks to have been subdued even earlier in the summer,” Bohnaker said. “Retail sales initially appeared to be gaining momentum in June and July, but downward revisions make it very unlikely that consumer spending will come close to the 3.3 percent growth rate achieved in the second quarter.” The National Retail Federation earlier this month cut its expectations for annual retail sales, estimating they now will grow by no more than 3.8 percent after initially forecasting a maximum increase of 4.2 percent. For More, See:Fashion Faces a Still-Uncertain Second HalfNRF Says Retail Is Not DyingDavid Simon Blames Expensive Online ‘Chase’ for Retail Woes

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RDDA, Retail Design & Development Awards, retail website design.#Retail #website #design


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What are the Retail Design Development Awards (RDDA)?

Exceptional shopping centre design deserves recognition. This is the aim of the RDDAs – to identify and award outstanding design and economic success of shopping centres within the South African property industry.

Entry Categories

There are four entry categories to choose from. A winner will be selected from each category.

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Create Account

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Exceptional design should be rewarded. The RDDAs are awarded annually for beautiful and functional design, and economic success of projects within the South African property industry.

New shopping centres can be entered, as well as existing centres that have undergone renovation and/or expansion. There is also a separate category for International entries.


Retail News, online retail sales.#Online #retail #sales


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Give a trendy gift this year. Here’s what’s on these Instagram stars’ wish lists 9 Hours Ago

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Higher food and clothing prices drives retail sales growth – BBC News, online retail sales.#Online


Higher food and clothing prices drives retail sales growth

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    Higher prices for food and clothing prices driven up by the weak pound fuelled retail sales growth last month.

    British Retail Consortium (BRC) and KPMG figures showed that like-for-like retail sales rose 1.9% in September

    That was far higher than the 0.4% increase for the same month last year. Total sales climbed 2.3%.

    Much of this growth was due to price rises filtering through, particularly in food and clothing, said BRC chief executive Helen Dickinson.

    “Retailers have worked hard to keep a lid on price rises following the depreciation of the pound, but with a potent mix of more expensive imports and increasing business costs from various government policies, something had to give at some point,” she said.

    “Spending is still being focused towards essential purchases; with consumers buying their winter coats and back to school items, but shying away from big ticket items such as furniture and delaying the renewal of key household electrical goods.”

    The survey showed that food sales rose by 2.5% on a like-for-like basis over the three months to September and 3.5% in total, while non-food sales rose by just 0.5%, or by 0.9% on a total basis.

    Non-food sales in stores slumped 2% last month, and slid by 1.5% in total in the three months to September.

    Yet online sales for non-food surged 10.7% in September – well above the three-month average of 10% – as shoppers responded well to online discounts.

    Paul Martin, KPMG UK’s head of retail, said: “With potential interest rate rises on the horizon, shaky consumer confidence and ever-increasing levels of household debt, uncertainty remains.

    “We’re now moving into the final quarter, which will ultimately define whether 2017 has been a good or bad year for retailers.”


    GraysOnline Australia – Online Retail & Auctions, online retail sales.#Online #retail #sales


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    The real reason our shops are shutting up, british retail consortium.#British #retail #consortium


    The real reason our shops are shutting up

    British retail consortium

    British retail consortium

    8:19PM BST 28 May 2013

    Another day, another report on the death of the high street. According to the Centre for Retail Research, the number of shops in Britain is predicted to fall by more than a fifth by 2018, blighting our town centres and suburban malls with a further 60,000 boarded-up stores. We are, it says, facing a crisis .

    This is certainly true but one of the main problems when it comes to fixing it is that we re blaming the wrong things. The usual culprits suggested are the march of the big supermarket chains, the state of the economy, and above all the growth of the internet. Even the biggest names in retail are not immune: last week, Marks Spencer said that it won t build any more clothes stores in the UK after 2016, as sales migrate online. And the mighty Tesco has said that it is ditching more than 100 empty plots of land that it had jealously and expensively acquired to build giant hypermarkets , and will instead focus on the internet.

    Certainly, the web has its part to play, as does the flatlining state of consumer spending. Yet according to retailers themselves, the biggest single reason why so many shops are closing down is because of rising financial demands from government, in the form of business taxes, and from landlords, in the form of rent.

    Take Clapham Books, the sort of shop that every high street needs. Friendly, independent and so plugged into the community that it deserves its own seat on the council, this south London bookshop is being forced to close at the end of the summer and look for cheaper premises elsewhere. If people see an independent bookshop closing they assume it s because of Amazon and e-books, says Ed McGarry, the shop s manager. But it s not. You can figure ways around all those things. It s about rising rent and business rates.

    In Clapham Books s case, a recent increase proposed by the landlord means that its rent will have quadrupled in 15 years. The same is happening all over the country. According to the British Retail Consortium, the overall cost of doing business for shopkeepers has risen from £96 billion to £116 billion since 2006. Looked at another way, costs have risen by 21 per cent against a sales increase of just 12 per cent. Even where rents have remained static, or fallen (as the British Property Federation claims they generally have), there s still the problem of business rates. These are partially set using that pernicious tool of government revenue-generation, the multiplier , adjusted every April in line with the previous September s inflation figure. So this year, rates rose by 2.8 per cent, adding £175 million to retailers bills overnight.

    Related Articles

    Of course, the internet is playing its part in the changing retail landscape. By 2018, a fifth of all sales will be online, and retailers of all sizes are being forced to adapt to ensure their long-term survival. As part of its reinvention, Tesco will not only focus on internet sales, but open more smaller shops. It also recently acquired Giraffe, the family restaurant chain, in recognition that its future is about giving people a day out rather than just luring them to a big shed full of products.

    John Lewis, meanwhile, is offering consumers increasingly flexible ways to shop: goods ordered online can be collected in department stores or branches of Waitrose, while shoppers can return online purchases of clothes and shoes at a network of 5,000 convenience stores and petrol stations across the UK. Hotel Chocolat, the fast-growing confectionery chain, has gone down the fine wine route. It is engaging shoppers by putting labels on its bars that show the terroir , including the year of the harvest and the amount of time the beans spent roasting. It also raised £3.7 million by launching a bond whereby investors were repaid in bimonthly deliveries of chocolate.

    In fact, all retailers are having to be increasingly inventive about how they think with some wonderful results. I was a judge for The Bookseller s awards earlier this month, in which dozens of retailers proved that the high street can still be a vibrant place. One small bookshop Linghams in the Wirral is so good at putting on events and editing its range to local tastes that a nearby branch of Tesco directs shoppers to it. And two years ago an entrepreneur called Amarjeet Singh opened 98p+ shops opposite Poundland branches, undercutting them by 2p.

    Britain remains a nation of shopkeepers ones with enough ideas to see the high street through its current crisis, even if in altered form. But for that to happen, ministers and landlords need to stop wringing their hands about the internet, and start cutting the crippling costs that retailers are forced to pay.


    Account Software, POS, Financial Accounting Software – IQ Retail, retail financial services.#Retail #financial #services


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    Retail industry, Business, The Guardian, british retail consortium.#British #retail #consortium


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    Freedom Recruitment, retail website design.#Retail #website #design


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